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Banteay Samre

Practical information on Banteay Samre

  • Encounters with locals
  • Place or Religious Monument
  • Place or Historical Monument
5 / 5 - One review
How to get there
20 minutes from Siem Reap by tuk-tuk
When to go
From November to July
Minimum stay
A few hours

Reviews of Banteay Samre

Romain Beuvart Seasoned Traveller
89 written opinions

Banteay Samré is an ancient Hindu temple near Siem Reap that counts as one of the temples of Angkor.

My suggestion:
As with all the temples of Angkor, if you want some peace and quiet when you come here, get up early in the morning! The only other quiet period is the midday to 1 pm timeslot, when most people are having their lunch.
My review

Though Siem Reap and the temples of Angkor are of course essential places to go to when in Cambodia, there are still choices to be made when it comes to deciding which of the temples to actually visit. Banteay Samré was one that figured on my own list of "things to see". And I wasn't disappointed.

I immediately liked the very rural environment here: the temple has a little rice field around it and there is a village located nearby. Banteay Samré stands a little apart from the other temples, and has an undeniable charm to it. When I was here I only encountered a few rare tourists, three quarters of whom were French. The temple dates from the 12th century and, like many of the others, has been superbly restored. It has the unusual feature of being surrounded by an actual wall: a six-metre high fortification that separates the temple from the area outside.

And in that very area outside, in fact, a small celebration was taking place: there were Cambodian people gathered around some old ladies, lots of food, and live music provided by musicians. Children played gently around the ruins and on the steps at the front of the temple while this was taking place. In the end, Banteay Samré turned out to be one of my favourite temples in Angkor, and I wasn't the only one who felt this way.